Otto-Eldred
School District

News

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Halloween Safety Tips

Halloween offers many opportunities for family fun. Following these tips will ensure that children and adults enjoy a safe, happy holiday.

“Pre-Treat” Them
Serve your child a Halloween dinner before trick or treating.
Bring sweets from home for your child to eat while trick or treating.
Inspect your child’s collection of treats before he or she eats them.

Dress Them Right
Dress your child in light-colored clothing and/or use reflective tape to improve visibility.
Cut large eyeholes in masks, or use face paint, to ensure your child can see clearly.
Equip your child with a flashlight if trick or treating after dark.

Review the Basics
Walk on sidewalks, not in the street.
Look both ways before crossing the street.
Accept candy at the door and never go into a stranger's house.
Visit homes that have the porch light on.

Stay Together
Don't let a child under 12 “trick or treat” without an adult.
Maintain a ratio of one adult to every two trick-or-treaters.
Pin a piece of paper with your child's name, address, and phone number to the inside of the costume.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration provides additional information about Halloween safety.

Parent/Teacher Communication

Your child spends more waking hours during the school week with his teacher than he does with you at home. That’s why it’s so important to develop and maintain a positive and open relationship with your child’s teacher. But you’re busy. The teacher’s busy. So how do you break the ice and keep things positive?

Be in communication from the get-go. Let your child’s teacher know of any concerns you have at the beginning of the year and whether or not you’re able to help out in the classroom. Find out the best way to reach the teacher, and then stay in touch by communicating throughout the school year.

Write a note to your child’s teacher. Let her know of any changes in your family situation, such as a new addition at home, someone moving out, a job loss, or other changes.

Make sure the school has your most up-to-date contact information including your cell, home, and work phone numbers. You never know when an emergency might come up or when your child’s teacher might need to contact you for some other reason.

Stay on top of grades and homework. If the teacher contacts you about missing assignments or other concerns, be sure to respond right away. A two-way communication will only benefit your child.

Let your child know that you view your relationship with his school as a partnership and that you and his teacher are there to help him — not to get him in trouble. Then be in contact with the classroom as often as possible. Even if you work away from home, you can still be in touch via phone and email. Just be sure your child’s teacher knows the best way to get in touch with you and that you know the best way to get in touch with the teacher.